ODDS AND ENDS

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014 | Uncategorized

The Vatican has redesigned their web site.  William Newton is unimpressed.

Brian Seage will become the next Episcopal Bishop of Mississippi.  The very first comment to this story should tell you everything you need to know about him.  This guy calls Seage a moonbat.

Rumors are circulating that celebrated Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel will be drafted by my Rams Thursday night.  I’m not sure how I feel about that.  Injury-prone, current QB Sam Bradford isn’t done yet and the examples of Kurt Warner and Peyton Manning should demonstrate the danger of giving up on “injury-prone” quarterbacks too early.  So I wouldn’t mind punching up the offensive line again.

On the other hand, my Rams play in a division against quarterbacks like Russell Wilson and Colin Kaepernick so a dynamic QB like Manziel would be a great thing to have if Sam goes down again.  And if A&M wide receiver Mike Evans slides down to pick #13, which my boys also have, the Rams will be able to nab a great wide receiver for Bradford to throw to and somebody who Manziel knows intimately when the time comes for Johnny Football to take over the starting job.  That’s the theory, anyway.

Seems that Protestants are a big deal in China these days.

I should change the name of this site to The Dust Blows Forward ‘N’ The Dust Blows Back.  Then people would take me seriously.

21 Comments to ODDS AND ENDS

Katherine
May 7, 2014

Susan Russell, and “Climate Disruption.” Disturbed thinking all around.

Allen Lewis
May 7, 2014

Well, the thing is that climate is not a static thing, so how can it really be disrupted; es[ecoa;;u bu [uny human efforts? This sounds like a Marketing Campaign. Hopefully, it will have just as little traction.

Lord have mercy!

Fuinseoig
May 7, 2014

Didn’t know the Vatican website had been revamped. Snazzy! ;-)

But I’m willing to bet it will still be “All documents in Italian. You want a translation into your own language? What do you think Babelfish is for?”

FW Ken
May 7, 2014

The picture of that demolished church is heartbreaking, especially when you consider what it looked like and the love with which it’s people tried to defend it.

The article makes a good point: Catholicism needs priests and visible sacraments. The house churches at the root of Chinese protestantism are not practical for Catholics. As I understand it, the Catholic Church in China exists in two parts: the official Church in the control of the government and an underground Catholic Church. I would like to hear more about how the latter operates, but understand that information should be kept low-key. In any case, the Vatican is trying to work things out with the communist regime, as it has in so many European countries. Revolutionary France and Nazi Germany come to mind.

Ed the Roman
May 7, 2014

There are official and underground protestant churches too. The official name has the phrase “Three-Self” in it, I think.

ccinnova
May 7, 2014

Since this is an odds and ends post, I thought I’d contribute something else. Rachel Held Evans says she isn’t over the World Vision debacle yet and didn’t appreciate being called a heretic. She conveniently omits why she’s considered one.

http://rachelheldevans.com/blog/faithfulness

dwstroudmd+
May 7, 2014

The O man is disrupting everything from the Constitution to the Foreign lack of Policy, why NOT the CLIMATE, with all that Democratic hot air, flatus and feces?

Allen Lewis
May 7, 2014

I see I lost track of my “home keys” in my previous post. This mangled fragment: “…so how can it really be disrupted; es[ecoa;;u bu [uny human efforts?”</strong should read:”…so how can it really be disrupted; especially by puny human efforts?”

Sorry for the mangling. I hope no one was seriously inconvenienced or harmed by my typos.

Allen Lewis
May 7, 2014

I see my attempts at correcting my mistakes have gone sadly awry. I think I will quit while I am ahead.

Ed the Roman
May 7, 2014

Sometimes I do that too.

CarolynP
May 7, 2014

Allen, sadly I was able to read the original just fine. Actual spelling is apparently overrated.

Christopher Johnson
May 7, 2014

I think I read in David Aikman’s book Jesus in Beijing (a book I heartily recommend) a comment from a Chinese Catholic to the effect that China would be a whole lot more Catholic than it is except for the Catholic Church’s rather lengthy reception process. If Rome could figure a way around that, the number of Chinese Catholics might skyrocket.

FW Ken
May 7, 2014

The current reception process (RCIA) is about 7 months, depending on the date of Easter. From what I remember, the Church up to Constantine had a process of 2 years or so. The New Testament had instances of immediate baptisms, but you have to ask why they went from that to an extended process. Bad experiences, maybe?

I’m sticking with the theory that the sacramental system slows numerical growth. You need priests. But in Latin America (I think) they seems catechists out info the boonies to teach and gather the Church together, then the priests come along as they can.

Finally, is important to remember that numerical growth is not the only growth that matters. Joel Osteen and Lakewood Church comes to mind.

Christopher Johnson
May 7, 2014

Thing is, if you want to be a Christian and you can be a full-fledged, genuine Christian right now instead of waiting seven months, where are you going to be inclined to go? If this movement goes the way I pray that it does, Catholicism will catch up eventually. Maybe even sooner than you or I know.

:-) After all, you made the swim.

Off topic but have you ever heard of that PBS travel show Globe Trekker? A couple of days ago, one of their hosts was traveling through east Texas. And one of their graphics actually spelled it “Forth Worth.” I can’t tell you how much I wanted to punch out my television.

Suburbanbanshee
May 7, 2014

A fair amount of the extended catechumen process was all about secrecy. St. Cyril of Jerusalem’s catechesis lectures come with a secrecy oath for the reader,and even the Our Father is something you don’t divulge to outsiders. (And actually, the eschatological house of David, on that day stuff in the Lord’s Prayer might have been misunderstood by the Empire, so yeah.)

He is extremely outspoken about people who want to join up just to learn magic spells, or to meet girls, or for other bizarre reasons. He practically does a Paper Chase speech about how some of you at this pre-Baptism lesson are lying about your motives and God will get you for it.

However, it’s also true that after early Christian times, the reception process has been pretty varied in different times and places, and particularly in missionary situations.

So yeah, there’s pastoral room for pastors to do immediate Baptisms, if the candidate seems already prepared by God or if there’s danger of death. You or me or a heathen atheist can do a Baptism in danger of death. But otherwise, you do it gradually.

Catechists are used all over the place. There’s been lots of catechist martyrs in the world. But man, it sucks to be doing missionary work or running a whole parish on nothing but a Sunday school teacher who’s not much educated himself. If you pick the wrong guy and he gets spiritually “creative,” you can have tons of trouble.

Ed the Roman
May 7, 2014

Forth Worth, Texas.
Tecksarchanough, Arkansa.
De Biouque, Iowa.

I can keep this up for hours.

Allen Lewis
May 7, 2014

CarolynP & Ed the Roman-

Thanks for the encouragement! :-P

The Editor
May 7, 2014

Yue misspelled Arkinsaw.

FW Ken
May 8, 2014

Becoming a Christian and church membership aren’t precisely the same thing. Or imprecisely, for that matter. To become Episcopalian, I went through inquirer sessions with Fr. Mack then waited 6 months for the bishop to come and confirm me. I think that some other mainline protestant have similar processes, and I want to say I’ve evangelical churches have them, too. I might be wrong about that.

I see Forth Worth a lot and yes, it drives me crazy. A co-worker does it, but she’s from Nigeria, so I cut her some slack. But with all the trouble I have with the auto-correct on this phone, I’m not casting stones.

Mark
May 8, 2014

Insisting on having everything “right now” is not always a good thing; it is often a problem that needs to be overcome.

Christopher Johnson
May 8, 2014

That must have been a long time ago, Ken. When I finally got confirmed in my early 30′s, I think the process took three Saturdays at the most. And if that official stuff doesn’t matter, becoming an Anglican now involves a two-step process:

(1) Deciding that you want to become an Anglican.

(2) Walking into an Anglican church and sitting down.

The important fact to consider is this: you have to see this from the non-Christian’s perspective, not your own. We’re talking about somebody who doesn’t yet know what you spent a long time learning.

You remember how it was. Once you learned the Truth, you wanted to jump in the pool right away, so to speak. If this church makes you wait for your swim while that one doesn’t, where are you going to go?

And this stuff does eventually sort itself out. How many Catholics or Orthodox started out as evangelical Protestants? Heck, Ken, you started out as a Baptist. :-) I don’t know if there will ever be a way to accurately gauge the numbers but as the years go by, I think the genuinely-Catholic Chinese population will sharply climb.

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