MARK YOUR CALENDARS

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013 | Uncategorized

In a couple of days, St. Luke’s Episcopal Outlet in Montclair, New Jersey will host this:

Pro-life? Got it.

Pro-choice? Fine.

But what about the woman in the middle? The girl who’s actually had the abortion? The one who’s feeling the feelings? What about the men who experience abortion?

These are the voices we don’t hear. Because they’re unexpected. Because they may make us uncomfortable. Because it’s not safe to speak.

Two young women, Kassi Underwood [Ms. Underwood is a "Writer, Speaker, Human," according to her web site] and Natalia Koss-Vallejo, are traveling the U.S. to share their abortion experience and facilitate a conversation with those in the audience to create an environment where silenced issues can be discussed in a way that begins to shift culture from stigma and shame to support and respect.

You get three guesses as to how this thing plays out but you’re only going to need one.

34 Comments to MARK YOUR CALENDARS

Allen Lewis
December 10, 2013

I wonder if the voices of those women who had abortions and now regret it will be heard with equal fervor as those who had abortions and are gung-ho fro more?

What a waste of energy and adding more CO2 to the atmosphere.

FW Ken
December 11, 2013

Do these women come from the poorer part of society, where they felt economically obligated to have an abortion? Will the voices of women pressured by boyfriends, husband, or parents be heard? Will the voices of men robbed of the chance to be fathers be heard?

I think not. And I guarantee no one will speak for the dead babies who have no voice.

ann r
December 11, 2013

I’ll bet they won’t talk about the link between abortion and breast cancer, either. I just read in Cal Catholic that a meta-analysis pooling 36 studies from 14 provinces in China, showed that abortion increased the risk of breast cancer by 44% with one abortion, and 76% and 89% with two and three abortions. Women need to know that.

gppp
December 11, 2013

Emil Faber would never say it, but Margaret Sanger would — ABORTION IS GOOD.

LaVallette
December 11, 2013

Very appropriate that this presentation by the two didacts of the need to “shift(ing) culture from stigma and shame to support and respect” for the best expression of Christian love that is the glorious and liberating Sacrament of abortion is taking place in a place where it is most appropriate during the Christmas Season. If that is not a poke in the eye for traditional meaning of, nothing is.

By the way, when are we having a similar discussion about the issue of murder and terrorism, by those who commit them to enable them to seek understanding and respect for the reasons behind their decision to commit them. Both their action involve the killing of a fellow human being. After all the vast majority of murderers and terrorists claim an equally “moral, liberating and personal future happiness, and economic” reason for their actions as those who have had an abortion,

Allen Lewis
December 11, 2013

As one of my former priests used to say, “We live in a broken and sinful world.”

Denise
December 11, 2013

There are already two very good initiatives that reach out to post-abortive women. They do not offer stigma and shame, but forgiveness and healing. They are Project Rachel and Silent No More. I doubt that either of these are mentioned by the two women featured in this article.

Denise
December 11, 2013

For some reason the Project Rachel posted above does not work. This is a better link for it anyway.

Katherine
December 11, 2013

Building support and respect for killing babies, during Advent. Come, Lord, soon.

Marie Blocher
December 11, 2013

Ann r
The statistics you cite make me wonder if it is the body turning on itself. Sort of “since you wont be needing these breasts to feed a child, they are unnecessary equipment.”
The human mind and its control over our bodies, hormones and emotions are quite often overlooked in the clinical studies.

Marie

HV Observer
December 11, 2013

Ah yes. Dear Montclair. I live quite near the above named pile of stones, and have driven through its streets. What you probably don’t know is that the township has not one but THREE active TEO congregations, a whole mess of other stone churches and synagogues, most of which display the Rainbow banner, and at least four abortuaries along its main business street.

It also went at least 80% for the current White House occupant both times, and in last month’s governor’s election, while Chris Christie got 60% statewide, Montclair went 70% for Buono (D).

Will I be going to this event? No. I want to prevent internal hemorraging, so it’s a matter of self-preservation.

Daniel Muller
December 11, 2013

I agree that their fine pro-choice voices need to be heard. In a confessional.

Ghouls.

Truth unites... And divides
December 11, 2013

Pro-voice?

Q from audience: do you believe you murdered your innocent baby?

gppp
December 11, 2013

TuAD — How tempting, and how appropriate. If I lived close enough I’d go just to see the gymnastics display these people are going to put on.

Lina
December 11, 2013

Years and years ago I read a book, written by an English psychologist who finally got to the root of why so many women in his area were suffering depression. Most had had abortions. His solution was to team up with an Anglican priest and go to the church and have a service, private, including repentance, confession, absolution and handing the baby over to the care of God.

Since reading the book every time I read about the number of abortions taking place I mentally think about how many women with emotional problems are wending their way through society at large. I have never read anything about how this afflicts the fathers.

dominic1955
December 11, 2013

“Ms. Underwood is a “Writer, Speaker, Human,” according to her web site]”

Oh, good. Glad that got cleared up! It is always nice when folks clarify that they are human so that one is not left fluttering in the wind of how to address them. Houseplant? Guppy? Chair? Whew…no egg on anyone’s face here!

CarolynP
December 11, 2013

“Writer, Speaker, Human”

Kill me now.

Ed the Roman
December 11, 2013

When I have a web site, I will refer to myself as a carbon unit.

Dale Price
December 11, 2013

A/k/a “The 2013 Bad Conscience Tour.”

And just in time for Advent!

George CS
December 11, 2013

Kyrie eleison. Not only during Advent, but isn’t the feast of the Holy Innocents coming up soon as well?? How ironic.

Bill2
December 11, 2013

“How about the women in the middle?” How about the baby in pieces in the dumpster?

Paula Loughlin
December 11, 2013

I know one thing that probably will not be heard and that is the truth of God’s forgiveness for the sin of abortion. Every time the sin of abortion is celebrated and defended hearts harden. They grow farther and farther away from the arms of mercy and that gift of forgiveness. But it is still there and it is always reachable because God reaches down to us no matter how long we stretch out to Him.

The boneshaking, unavoidable reality of sin was brought home to me when I had my abortion. Right then at that awful moment I began my journey back to Jesus Christ and the Catholic Church. It took a while and for a long time I tried to get away with “I am personally opposed but….” line of bull crap. God however was not accepting that at all and in His love for me He kept sweeping away the BS and piercing my heart with reminders of me need to fall on my knees and grieve and confess and reconcile and rejoice.

I was lost and He found me to bring me back. I had the stench of sin on my lips and still He forgave me. I doubt they will hear that truth.

Paula Loughlin
December 11, 2013

Pro abortion voices have been silenced. These people don’t get out much, do they?

Therese Z
December 11, 2013

Paula, thank you for your testimony.

Maxine
December 11, 2013

Odd, isn’t it, that before the “pill” abortion was rather rare? At least, where I came from. Pro-choice was with or without cream.

Elaine S.
December 12, 2013

“before the ‘pill’ abortion was rather rare”

I would venture to say that the Pill did for abortion what the cotton gin did for slavery. That might seem counterintuitive in both cases — the cotton gin made cotton processing LESS labor intensive so one would think it would have reduced the demand for slaves. Likewise, if the Pill made unwanted pregnancy less likely one would think it would decrease the demand for abortion.

In the case of the cotton gin, the history books tell us, precisely because it made cotton processing faster and easier it increased demand for cotton and with it, demand for slaves to work the cotton fields. In the case of the Pill, even liberal and secular observers agree it made the sexual revolution possible, and with that came increased demand/expectation for consequence-free sex, and hence, more demand for abortion.

Therese Z
December 12, 2013

I’m not sure it was exactly rare. Lots and lots of ” D&C’s” when women could complain of an irregular cycle, and everybody knew what was happening. So says my 80-something aunts.

Let’s say it was discreet and much harder to obtain.

Katherine
December 12, 2013

Paula, I think of you and the forgiveness you have received whenever I see reports of these women who are setting themselves against repentance and forgiveness. It’s tragic.

For unmarried women, before the legal abortion racket got going, it was decline or face the obvious physical consequences. At least the moral choices were clear. Now, “morality” isn’t even considered by most.

Chris M
December 12, 2013

Wow, Ed. A Star Trek: The Motion Picture reference? What’s next? Ugly Bags of Mostly Water? Styrofoam Dodecahedrons?

LaVallette
December 12, 2013

“I’m not sure it was exactly rare. Lots and lots of ” D&C’s” when women could complain of an irregular cycle, and everybody knew what was happening. So says my 80-something aunts.”

Not exactly the knitting needle variety of backyard abortion with all the perforated intestines and uteri of the Pro Abortion Legalization movement throughout the world. It has long emerged by the admission of those involved that numbers of “backyard abortions” and “deaths from such abortions” were simply plucked out of the air as the “fear” part of the propaganda campaign. This element is still raised nowadays when ever any limitations on universal abortion rights is perceived by the Pro Choice brigade.

Therese Z
December 13, 2013

I also understand that there as many deaths from back alley abortions now as before Roe v Wade. Women who resort to it are as ill informed of as poor or as off the social radar as they were then; the same women make the same choice, sadly.

dominic1955
December 13, 2013

The coat hanger abortion thing is pretty much just a leyenda negra. Jam this piece of metal into yourself and hope you don’t die does not sound like a reasonable expectation of ending a pregnancy even for those who are self-made desperate about it. Seems that falling down the stairs or drinking an assload of liquor would be a much safer bet.

Some people blow their heads off. Why? Who knows. Some (and a very few, I’d add) puncture their inner organs by the agency of a random metal object. Sounds like insanity all around, and no reason to ban guns or approve clinical abortion.

FW Ken
December 13, 2013

Two of my great aunts had abortions back in the 30s/40s. One self-inflicted and died. The other lived into her 80s.

The truth is that the “back-alley butcher” was usually a doctor or midwife willing to do the deed. They had every incentive to be careful. That’s unlike today’s abortion practices, which are politically protected. Now, the butchers have moved curbside.

Elaine S.
December 14, 2013

“Lots and lots of ”D&C’s” when women could complain of an irregular cycle, and everybody knew what was happening.”

My late mother, who came of age in the 1940s, told me this practice was common at a hospital in her hometown (according to people she knew who had worked there). The doctors would do these procedures and explain away the results by saying “Oops, we didn’t know she was pregnant.” This happened so often that these doctors either had to be dumber than entire truckloads of rocks, or knew exactly what they were doing.

“the ‘back alley butcher’ was usually a doctor or midwife willing to do the deed.”

Very true. A doctor who performed abortions in the pre-Roe era might face loss of his medical license if caught. What Roe did was not so much eliminate the “back alley butchers” as allow them to set up shop legally and go on doing exactly what they had always done.

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