GLASS HALF FULL

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010 | Uncategorized

Things couldn’t be better in the Episcopal Organization.  General Theological Seminary’s officially underwater:

The Board of Trustees of the General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church resolved to move forward in finding the financial resources necessary to meet fiscal challenges that have recently surfaced in connection with its search for a new Dean and President. The current Dean, the Very Rev. Ward B. Ewing announced in December his intention to retire once his replacement has been hired.

At the conclusion of the Board’s meeting on March 29, Board Chair, the Rev. Canon Denis O’Pray, said trustees determined to ask the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori, in response to her willingness to help, to convene a special think tank. Composed of board members and other Episcopal Church leaders, the group will address the Seminary’s pressing financial concerns in the context of the Church’s overall needs for theological education. In addition, the Board asked the Search Committee for a New Dean to consider instead the creation of an interim position so that the Seminary might fully appraise its financial situation and finalize specific ways of moving forward.

Not to worry.  Two more homosexual bishops should clear that right up.

26 Comments to GLASS HALF FULL

carolynP
March 30, 2010

Simple. Sell the property to the Muslims.

Next?

Floridian
March 30, 2010

Several sources of funding come to mind right off the bat:

1. Use the money allocated for litigation.

2. Use the money allocated for the Continuing Indaba (pansexual/abortion propaganda) Project

3. Consolidate several dioceses and let some fat cats go get real jobs and force those that stay on to do some real work.

4. Cut Robbie’s talk and travel tour by half.

5. Repent, clean the heretics and apostates out of the seminaries and get some sure ’nuff Christian believers in there who will teach and preach the real Gospel.

Bart
March 30, 2010

Simple:

Phase 1: Collect Underpants
Phase 2: ?
Phase 3: Profit

Duane
March 30, 2010

It was a week spent at a conference at GTS that finally pushed me to swim the Tiber.

LA Episcopal Priest
March 30, 2010

good!

anonagain
March 30, 2010

beats me why they need a place to learn theology…i mean they just make it up as they go along.

maybe its where they learn all the Piskie doublespeak and “living into it” buzzphrases

Michael D
March 31, 2010

beats me why they need a place to learn theology

They need theological colleges because some postulants have had a real conversion experience and feel called by God. Such people must be sent to theological college to have that deity stuff debunked and replaced by empty sophisms and sneering disdain for the unwashed “born agains.”

Some postulants (perhaps the preferred ones) were drawn by their scores on a career quiz, which does not even mention belief in God as an indicator of suitability. It could be argued that such postulants do not need theological college, as they are already theologically incompetent.

Christopher Hathaway
March 31, 2010

There’s no reason why the seminary couldn’t lease it’s building’s out to strip clubs and dirty book stores. They wouldn’t have to change much at all. Maybe they could put a dance pole in the chapel sanctuary.

Allen Lewis
March 31, 2010

…in the context of the Church’s overall needs for theological education.

Yeah, there is definitely a need for theological education in the Episcopal Organization. Wonder when they will get around to that?

Allen Lewis
March 31, 2010

I see that all comments, so far, share a mutual disdain for GTS and the Episcopal Organization. But GTS is not the worst of the so-called seminaries that perpetuate theological ignorance and apostasy within the Episcopal thingy.

Virginia Theological Seminary has long since gone over to the dark side. EDS – home of Katie Ragsdale – is further down the path to dissolution than GTS is.

Yet, GTS stands as a beacon of fecklessness when it come to theological education.

Why is that, folks?

Sparky
March 31, 2010

Sell all the books except Spong and Borg. They’re just collecting dust.

midwestnorwegian
March 31, 2010

I guess Bishop Craig Anderson’s decision years ago to create a “same sex couples” dorm didn’t help much to attract a bigger crowd. Isn’t working in the pews either. Hmmm…

Creedal Episcopalian
March 31, 2010

A $100,000,000 endowment would do absolutely nothing for
“the Church’s overall needs for theological education.”

unreconstructed rebel
March 31, 2010

Michael D:

They need theological colleges because some postulants have had a real conversion experience and feel called by God.

That’s not it. It is my observation that such cannot get by the screening boards set up to make sure such dangerous thinking never gets into a pulpit.

Smurf Breath
March 31, 2010

the group will address the Seminary’s pressing financial concerns in the context of the Church’s overall needs for theological education.

The ‘financial concerns’ are due to lack of enrollment. But if no one is entering the seminaries in order to learn ‘theology’ (ie. how higher criticism and deconstruction can be applied to feminist liberation theology and queer theory), one would assume the ‘overall need’ is nil.

qwerty
March 31, 2010

Why go through all the trouble of convening a search committee when they have a prime candidate for Dean right in their own back yard? Katharine Jefferts Schori once served as Dean of The Good Samaritan School of Theology… they would consider that a peer institution, wouldn’t they?

Doug Stein
March 31, 2010

All institutions except the Church Triumphant have a “close-by” date. (Even the Church Militant does – it’s called the apocalypse!)

Worldly institutions often create endowments (if they’re a non-profit) or cash hoards (if they’re for-profit) as insurance against short-term acute difficulties. They smooth the financial fluctuations caused by the business cycle.

However, if the underlying institution ceases to live, endowments and cash hoards can only temporarily stave of death and extinction. TEO is dead – and living off dead people’s money. Much of the activity by the revisionist leaders is not the normal functioning of the organism or the healthy growth of an organization. They are in fact serving as carrion-eaters or bacteria feeding off the dead body – or liquidators making a living selling off the fixtures.

The only question is whether the decomposition of TEO will be gradual like the Unitarians or abrupt like other sexual cults.

(Yes, I *do* know the Lord’s call to Ezekiel to prophesy to the dry bones, but that call is to his people – the Church – not to any single denomination.)

Doug

Whitestone
March 31, 2010

The ABC is celebrating Holy Week by moving further behind the decimel in his Christian credibility score:

http://www.anglican-mainstream.net/2010/03/31/archbishop-of-canterbury-rebukes-claims-of-persecuted-christians-in-uk/

Anonymous Anglican
March 31, 2010

Carol read my mind. Just sell it. It will make more money and be more productive that way.

Truth Unites... and Divides
March 31, 2010

“The only question is whether the decomposition of TEO will be gradual like the Unitarians or abrupt like other sexual cults.”

My guess is gradual. But whether gradual or abrupt, there will still be Institutionalist-Enablers for TEc’s soul-destroying heresy and apostasy who will still rationalize and justify their “call” to stay in TEc until the end.

These are pathetic co-dependents who don’t see how they’re enabling the destructive fire.

FW Ken
March 31, 2010

cannot get by the screening boards

That’s not a liberal/conservative issue. In 1984, I went through The Process for ordination in the Episcopal Diocese of Dallas. In an early interview, I faced one of the several committees and was asked why I wanted to be a priest. Part of my answer was “I believe the Lord is calling me to it”. IMMEDIATELY, I was informed that the Lord was calling if THEY said the Lord was calling. I didn’t say THAT again, believe me.

A Senior Priest
March 31, 2010

Further proof of the existence of God.

The young fogey
March 31, 2010

Wow.

They may well drive themselves into the ground.

Not my problem.

Dale Matson
April 1, 2010

There are two problems with TEC seminaries (Not Trinity or Nashota House). Perhaps the biggest problem is that they kill the faith of the seminarian. The second problem is that they are a place of indoctrination not edification. Those at CDSP who trained KJS were probably pleased with her. Unfortunately, it is obvious that she does not know better. She didn’t change her Christology, Soteriology, Eccesiology, etc. along the way. She simply was not properly instructed or assessed. She also trained with the Jesuits as a part of her experience. How coherent and integrated was her curriculum? She was at CDSP about the same time as Genpo Forrester. Same problem. I do not believe either one could pass the canonical exams given in our Diocese (DSJ).

The Pilgrim
April 1, 2010

Dale,

“She [KJS] also trained with the Jesuits as a part of her experience. How coherent and integrated was her curriculum?”

The Jesuit label, sadly, is no longer a guarantee of orthodoxy. Many of them, especially on the academic side, are not friends to the traditionalists in the RCIA.

In fact, now that you say that, Jesuit academic training does explain a lot about KJS’s theology (or lack thereof…)

Bill (not IB)
April 1, 2010

I’m surprised no one has yet chimed in with what I’d have to say is the obvious factor here.

TEC doesn’t need anyone with theological training. It has no core doctrine, holds no one accountable for espousing and teaching views which have more in common with Scientology than Christianity, and couldn’t give a hoot about anything other than how many seats are filled by pledging attendees.

However, in order to ensure that the last clause of the previous sentence remains as large as possible, TEC *does* need lawyers – lots and lots of them. Their legal bills for all of the suits against reasserter parishes and dioceses are astronomical. Think how much they could save if, instead of educating a group in the ins and outs of theology, they instead provide them with a law degree, and then instead of having to pay by the billable hour to an outside law firm they could simply have their own staff of DBB clones.

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